Demography and natural history of the common fruit bat
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Demography and natural history of the common fruit bat Artibeus jamaicensis, on Barro Colorado Island, Panamá by

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Published by Smithsonian Institution Press in Washington, D.C .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementCharles O. Handley, DonE. Wilson and Alfred L. Gardner, editors.
SeriesSmithsonian contributions to zoology -- no.511
ContributionsHandley, Charles O., Wilson, Don E., Gardner, Alfred L., Smithsonian Institution.
The Physical Object
Pagination173p. :
Number of Pages173
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21935513M
ISBN 101560981466

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Demography and natural history of the common fruit bat, Artibeus jamaicensis, on Barro Colorado Island, Panama Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology No. NTIS Accession Number: PB Demography and natural history of the common fruit bat, Artibeus jamaicensis, on Barro Colorado Island, Panamá Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Mammalogy December with Reads. A Natural History of Australian Bats uncovers the unique biology and ecology of these wonderful creatures. It features a description of each bat species found in Australia, as well as a section on bat myths. The book is enhanced by stunning colour photographs from Steve Parish, most of which have never been seen before.   Journals & Books; Help Download PDF Natural History of Vampire Bats, CRC Press, Boca Raton () C.O. Handley Jr, D.E. Wilson, A.L. Gardner (Eds.), Demography and Natural History of the Common Fruit Bat, Artibeus jamaicensis, on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, Smithsonian Institution Press.

The Jamaican, common or Mexican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis) is a fruit-eating bat native to Mexico, through Central America to northwestern South America, as well as the Greater and many of the Lesser is also an uncommon resident of the Southern tions east of the Andes in South America are now usually regarded a separate species, the flat-faced fruit-eating bat. Demography and natural history of the Common Fruit Bat Artibeus jamaicensis on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C. Bats: A Natural History. John Edwards Africa animals appear aspect associated attached banding become birds blood body Brown called cause caves cells Chapter close colonies common cycle daily Distribution early ears echolocation example extends extremely feeding females finger flight flying foraging frequency fruit bats genera groups habits. The National Museum of Natural History remains temporarily closed. To view the status of the Smithsonian’s other museums and the National Zoo, please visit

Demography and natural history of the common fruit bat, Artibeus jamaicensis, on Barro Colorado Island, Panamá JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Demography and natural history of the common fruit bat, Artibeus jamaicensis, on Barro Colorado Island, Panamá. A fruit bat with broad and long wing (Fa 60) having upper and lower incisors Calcar well-developed, extending far behind the tibia. Adult male strongly built, with a grotesque muscular head. Fur on the head are short and more dark brown. Ears are uniformly dark without any distinct margin of pale colour. Normally found in Evergreen forests. Catalogue of Monkeys, Lemurs, and Fruit-eating Bats in the Collection of the British Museum: Authors: British Museum (Natural History). Dept. of Zoology, John Edward Gray: Editor: John Edward Gray: Publisher: order of the Trustees, Original from: Oxford University: Digitized: Length: pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX. INTRODUCTION. The remarkable mammals known as “bats” and “flying foxes” (order Chiroptera [“hand wing”]) may be the most abundant, diverse, and geographically dispersed vertebrates (Table (Table1). 1).Although a great deal is known about them, detailed information is needed to explain the astonishing variations of their anatomy, their lifestyles, their roles in ecosystems ecology.